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Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment
Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential
new treatments for cancer with the goal of eventually
making new treatment options available

Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential new
treatments for cancer, with the goal of eventually improving
available treatment options.

Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment

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TRITON2
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Image is not available
Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment
Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential
new treatments for cancer with the goal of eventually
making new treatment options available
Image is not available

Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment

Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential new
treatments for cancer, with the goal of eventually improving
available treatment options.

Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment

Image is not available
Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment
Image is not available
Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential
new treatments for cancer with the goal of eventually
making new treatment options available
Image is not available

Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment

Cancer clinical trials are designed to test potential new
treatments for cancer, with the goal of eventually improving
available treatment options.

Finding Possibilities for
Cancer Treatment

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About TRITON Trials
There are two ongoing TRITON (Trial of Rucaparib in ProsTate IndicatiONs) studies of rucaparib in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that are open to men with advanced prostate cancer
About Rucaparib
Rucaparib is a poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase or PARP inhibitor that is being studied for the treatment of mCRPC in men whose prostate cancers have a BRCA1, BRCA2 or ATM genetic alteration, which can be detected with tests that physicians can perform on prostate cancer cells
About Prostate Cancer
If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you are not alone, as about 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime. Learning as much as you can about available treatment options, including clinical trials, and being involved in choosing the right option for you may be helpful to you

 

How Might Rucaparib Affect Prostate Cancer?

Rucaparib is a PARP inhibitor that is being studied for the treatment of mCRPC. Rucaparib has not been approved by any regulatory body, including the FDA, for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Rucaparib is thought to work by targeting key proteins (PARP) involved in the DNA repair process. Cancer cells undergo rapid DNA replication, therefore, mistakes in their DNA sequence can quickly accumulate if they are not repaired, leading to tumor cell death. Rucaparib is being studied to evaluate its effect in men with mCRPC with alterations in the breast cancer (BRCA) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) genes. Other genetic markers that are being studied to determine if they can identify men who may respond to rucaparib include BARD1, BRIP1, CDK12, CHEK2, FANCA, NBN, PALB2, RAD51, RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, and RAD54L.

 

Such alterations in DNA-repair genes can be detected with tests that physicians can perform on DNA from prostate cancer cells.

ABOUT AVAILABLE TRITON TRIALS.

You may be eligible to participate in one of two TRITON clinical trials if:

You are at least 18 years of age


Have a histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or poorly differentiated carcinoma of the prostate


Have experienced disease progression after treatment with at least 1 prior next generation androgen receptor-targeted therapy (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide) for mCRPC


Have a deleterious alteration in BRCA1/2 or ATM, or molecular evidence of other homologous recombination deficiency